Middle East & North Africa Publications, June 2011

12 07 2011

A list of recent reports on the Middle East & North Africa that were highlighted in the June issue of the Democracy Resource Center Bulletin.

The Insurgency in Afghanistan’s Heartland
http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/asia/south-asia/afghanistan/207-the-insurgency-in-afghanistans-heartland.aspx
Collusion between insurgent elements and corrupt government officials in Kabul and the nearby provinces has increased, leading to a profusion of criminal networks in the Afghan heartland. Source: International Crisis Group

Investing in a More Robust Public Policy Environment in the Middle East
http://csis.informz.net/CSIS/data/images/rbf_public_policy_paper_final.pdf
The report argues that donors should work to enhance receptivity to public policy discussions, foster sustainable business models for civil society organizations, and create a supply of policy entrepreneurs in the region. Source: Center for Strategic & International Studies

Inclusion of a publication does not imply ownership or endorsement by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED); rather, these are publications that the Democracy Resource Center believes would be of interest to NED staff and others interested in democracy promotion.

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MENA Publications, March 2011

8 04 2011

A list of recent reports on the Middle East and North Africa that were highlighted in the March issue of the Democracy Resource Center Bulletin.

Iraq and the Kurds: Confronting Withdrawal Fears
http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/middle-east-north-africa/iraq-syria-lebanon/iraq/103%20Iraq%20and%20the%20Kurds%20Confronting%20Withdrawal%20Fears.aspx
Iraq’s new coalition government and the Kurdistan regional government in Erbil must start talks on disputed internal boundaries or risk an outbreak of violent conflict along a “trigger” line dividing army troops and Kurdish regional guard forces, the peshmergas. Source: International Crisis Group

The Syrian Rift
http://www.brookings.edu/opinions/2011/0327_syria_rabinovich.aspx
Bashar al-Assad’s dictatorship is facing its biggest crisis since he inherited his father’s position in June 2000. Not long ago, in a long, thrilling interview with the Wall Street Journal, Assad spoke about the stability of his regime, in sharp contrast to the crumbling Mubarak regime. Source: Brookings

Yemen between Reform and Revolution
http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/middle-east-north-africa/iran-gulf/yemen/102-popular-protest-in-north-africa-and-the-middle-east-II-yemen-between-reform-and-revolution.aspx
Unprecedented protests and the regime’s heavy-handed response risk pushing Yemen into widespread violence but also could and should be a catalyst for long overdue, far reaching political reform. Source: International Crisis Group

Inclusion of a publication does not imply ownership or endorsement by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED); rather, these are publications that the Democracy Resource Center believes would be of interest to NED staff and others interested in democracy promotion.





Yemen: Background and U.S. Relations

24 11 2009

URL: http://opencrs.com/document/RL34170/. Source: Library of Congress.

With limited natural resources, a crippling illiteracy rate, and high population growth, Yemen faces an array of daunting development challenges that some observers believe make it at risk for becoming a failed state in the next few decades. Between 2007 and 2008, it ranked 153 out of 177 countries on the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Index, a score comparable to the poorest sub-Saharan African countries.





Assessing the State of Local Democracy in a sensitive environment – by citizens of Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Yemen

15 05 2009

URL: http://www.idea.int/arab_world/assessing_sold_arabworld.cfm
Source: International IDEA

For the past twenty years people in the Arab world have been urging their governments to join the new wave of democratization that has been sweeping the world. While not averse to the idea, their leaders have been reluctant simply to import Western models of participation. What was needed were new mechanisms for giving people a voice in keeping with their own local customs and traditions.