Europe & Eurasia Publications, June 2011

12 07 2011

A list of recent reports on Europe & Eurasia that were highlighted in the June issue of the Democracy Resource Center Bulletin.

EU anti-corruption requirements: measuring progress in Albania, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia and Turkey
http://bit.ly/k308Oy
Albania, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia and Turkey must do more to guarantee the effective implementation of anti-corruption laws, according to a report from Transparency International, which calls on the governments to build capacity and improve governance in key institutions. Source: Transparency International

Georgia’s Choices: Charting a Future in Uncertain Times
http://www.carnegieendowment.org/publications/?fa=view&id=44553
Georgia is entering a period of transition, with parliamentary and presidential elections due in 2012-2013, after which a new constitution will take effect. Source: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

The New Role of Central and Eastern Europe in International Democracy Support
http://www.carnegieendowment.org/publications/?fa=view&id=44375
The democracy promotion efforts of these countries-countries that are still grappling with some domestic democracy issues of their own-have been limited in scope and inconsistent, ad hoc, and given a low priority at times. Still, these countries have very recent, in fact ongoing experience with democratization that gives them valuable expertise and perspectives that other donors do not have, and therefore special credibility in the eyes of recipients. Source: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Inclusion of a publication does not imply ownership or endorsement by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED); rather, these are publications that the Democracy Resource Center believes would be of interest to NED staff and others interested in democracy promotion.





Russia-Georgia Conflict in South Ossetia: Context and Implications for U.S. Interests.

29 01 2010

URL: http://opencrs.com/document/RL34618. Source: Library of Congress.

This report notes that In the early 1990s, Georgia and its breakaway South Ossetia region had agreed to a Russian-mediated ceasefire that provided for Russian “peacekeepers” to be stationed in the region. Moscow extended citizenship and passports to most ethnic Ossetians. Simmering long-time tensions erupted on the evening of August 7, 2008, when South Ossetia and Georgia accused each other of launching intense artillery barrages against each other.





Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests.

29 01 2010

URL: http://opencrs.com/document/RL33453. Source: Library of Congress.

This report notes that the United States recognized the independence of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia when the former Soviet Union broke up at the end of 1991. The United States has fostered these states’ ties with the West in part to end the dependence of these states on Russia for trade, security, and other relations. The United States has pursued close ties with Armenia to encourage its democratization and because of concerns by Armenian-Americans and others over its fate.





Georgia-Russia: Still Insecure and Dangerous

1 12 2009

URL: <a href="http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=6171&l=1&quot; target=
“blank”>http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=6171&l=1. Source: International Crisis Group.

This report examines the situation ten months after the August 2008 war and finds deep cause for concern. Moscow’s 15 June Security Council veto of an extension of the sixteen-year-old UN observer mission’s mandate in Georgia and Abkhazia and its apparent intention to require the removal of the mission of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) by 30 June are blows to regional security that will fuel tensions.





Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

21 11 2009

URL: http://opencrs.com/document/RL33453/. Source: Library of Congress.

The United States recognized the independence of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia when the former Soviet Union broke up at the end of 1991. The United States has fostered these states’ ties with the West in part to end the dependence of these states on Russia for trade, security, and other relations. The United States has pursued close ties with Armenia to encourage its democratization and because of concerns by Armenian-Americans and others over its fate.