Africa Publications, May 2011

1 06 2011

A list of recent reports on Africa that were highlighted in the May issue of the Democracy Resource Center Bulletin.

Congo: The Electoral Dilemma
http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/africa/central-africa/dr-congo/175-congo-the-electoral-dilemma.aspx
Faced with the dilemma of respecting the constitutional deadline and organising botched elections, or ignoring that deadline and sliding into a situation of unconstitutional power, the Congolese authorities have chosen the first option. Source: International Crisis Group

Silencing the New Front: the Emergence of Widespread Torture against the Youth Movement
http://bit.ly/l7hDBv
The report documents the continued arrest and torture of students and youth at universities throughout Sudan, and in Abu Shouk and Al Salaam IDP Camps in El Fashir, North Darfur. Source: African Centre for Justice and Peace Studies

Inclusion of a publication does not imply ownership or endorsement by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED); rather, these are publications that the Democracy Resource Center believes would be of interest to NED staff and others interested in democracy promotion.





Middle East & North Africa Publications, April 20ll

6 05 2011

A list of recent reports on Middle East and North Africa that were highlighted in the April issue of the Democracy Resource Center Bulletin.

No News is Good News: Abuses against Journalists by Palestinian Security Forces
http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2011/04/06/no-news-good-news
This report documents cases in which security forces tortured, beat, and arbitrarily detained journalists, confiscated their equipment, and barred them from leaving the West Bank and Gaza. Source: Human Rights Watch

Traveling toward the Rule of Law in the Middle East and North Africa: Avenues and Obstacles
http://www.usip.org/publications/traveling-toward-the-rule-law-in-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-avenues-and-obstacles
Popular uprisings throughout the Middle East and North Africa are demanding justice, security, and accountability- defining features of the rule of law. Source: United States Institute of Peace

Voices of a Revolution: Conversations with Tunisia’s Youth
http://bit.ly/iNxymJ
Findings from focus groups with young Tunisian men and women conducted March 11 to 24, 2011. Source: National Democratic Institute (NDI)

Inclusion of a publication does not imply ownership or endorsement by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED); rather, these are publications that the Democracy Resource Center believes would be of interest to NED staff and others interested in democracy promotion.





The Post-Communist Generation in the Former Eastern Bloc

9 03 2010

URL: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1467/post-communist-millennial-generation-more-positive-democracy-free-market
Source: Pew Research Center

This report notes that members of the post-communist generation, who are now between the ages of 18 and 39, offer much more positive evaluations of the political and economic changes their countries have undergone over the past two decades than do those who were adults when the Iron Curtain fell.
The younger generation is also more individualistic and more likely to endorse a free market economy than are those who are ages 40 or older.
Throughout 2010, the Pew Research Center will release a series of reports that explore the values, attitudes and behavior of America’s Millennial Generation, which first came of age around the time of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and played an important role in the election of President Barack Obama. The Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project’s contribution to this project focuses on a somewhat different age group: the post-communist generation in the former Eastern bloc. The generation gap on attitudes about democracy and capitalism in Eastern Europe reflects a divide among the past, present and future. Concerns about the way things are going span all ages, but while the older generation looks back longingly, often saying that people were better off financially under communism, the younger generation expresses more confidence that democracy can solve their countries’ problems.





Between Patronage and Rebellion: Student Politics in Afghanistan

26 02 2010

URL: http://www.areu.org.af/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=26&task=doc_download&gid=753
Source: Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU)

Student politics is an important aspect of politics in most countries and its study is important to understanding the origins, development and future of political parties. Student politics is also relevant to elite formation, because elites often take their first steps in the political arena through student organisations. In Afghanistan today, student politics moves between two poles—patronage and rebellion—and through its study we can catch a glimpse of the future of Afghan politics.

The research is based on approximately 100 interviews with students and political activists in Kabul, Herat, Mazar-i-Sharif and Jalalabad, as well as approximately 12 interviews with former student activists of the 1960-70s.





The Post-Communist Generation in the Former Eastern Bloc

26 01 2010

URL: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1467/post-communist-millennial-generation-more-positive-democracy-free-market
Source: Pew Research Center

Members of the post-communist generation, who are now between the ages of 18 and 39, offer much more positive evaluations of the political and economic changes their countries have undergone over the past two decades than do those who were adults when the Iron Curtain fell. The younger generation is also more individualistic and more likely to endorse a free market economy than are those who are ages 40 or older.
The Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project’s contribution to this project focuses on a somewhat different age group: the post-communist generation in the former Eastern bloc. The generation gap on attitudes about democracy and capitalism in Eastern Europe reflects a divide among the past, present and future. Concerns about the way things are going span all ages, but while the older generation looks back longingly, often saying that people were better off financially under communism, the younger generation expresses more confidence that democracy can solve their countries’ problems.





Nigeria’s Imperative for Youth-Led Entrepreneurial Development.

7 01 2010

URL: http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1871667&msgid=176453&act=9NPD&c=143157&admin=0&destination=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cipe.org%2Fpublications%2Ffs%2Fpdf%2F123008.pdf. Source: CIPE.

This report notes that In spite of its abundant natural and human resources, Nigeria has long suffered from weak development. For Nigeria to prosper, young people must be given a chance to be leaders and entrepreneurs. The challenge is to create an environment where young entrepreneurs can lead the country’s development.





Tajikistan: On the Road to Failure.

21 12 2009

URL: http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=5907&l=1. Source: International Crisis Group.

Without sweeping reforms to address food security, energy infrastructure and corruption, President Rakhmon’s regime is in danger of collapse. Until recently, half of Tajikistan’s workforce has been working abroad. Migrant labour has served not only as an easy way out for the country’s largely do-nothing leadership. It has also created a political safety valve providing jobs for the young, more energetic members of the population who might otherwise have taken their protests to the street