Read in 2010

22 12 2010

Listed below are the five most circulated (or most often checked-out) books from the Democracy Resource Center. In alphabetical order, the most popular books are:

1. The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa by Deborah Brautigam, 2009.
2. Illict: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats Are Hijacking the Global Economy by Moisés Naím, 2008.
3. In From the Cold: Latin America’s New Encounter with the Cold War by G. M. Joseph and Daniela Spenser, 2008.
4. Media and Democracy in Africa by Göran Hydén, Michael Leslie and Folu Folarin Ogundimu, 2002.
5. Silenced: International Journalists Expose Media Censorship by David Dadge, 2005.

Surprisingly, no books published in 2010 made it into the top 5. New books that were frequently read this year are: New Challenges to Democratization, Sudan: Darfur and the Failure of an African State and Violent Democracies in Latin America.

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Beta Release of JSTOR Mobile

12 11 2010

http://mobile.jstor.org/

According to JSTOR’s Support & Training documentation:

“JSTOR Mobile Beta is best used for searching JSTOR while you’re on the go, and then emailing the citations to yourself so you can read the articles later on a computer.”

If you want to access the full-text of an article, you’ll probably need to be using the organization, university or library network.

Just a reminder that the Democracy Resource Center provides access to JSTOR for visitors and employees of the National Endowment for Democracy.





How does your country’s library services compare?

12 08 2010

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has published its 2010 World Report. The report evaluates participating countries in terms of freedom of information and freedom of expression, and  focuses on how these issues relate to libraries and library services.

Read more: http://www.iflaworldreport.org/





Mauritania’s Desert Libraries

6 08 2010

Very interesting article published in The Guardian (and originally in Le Monde) about efforts to preserve rare Arabic manuscripts in Mauritania.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jul/27/mauritania-heritage-books-libraries





Library of Congress Country Studies Database

1 04 2008

URL: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/csquery.html. Searchable database of online versions of books previously published in hard copy (with the exception of a born-digital study on Macau and an unpublished partial draft study on Afghanistan) by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress as part of the Country Studies/Area Handbook Series sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Army between 1986 and 1998. At present, 101 countries and regions are covered. Each study offers a comprehensive description and analysis of the country or region’s historical setting, geography, society, economy, political system, foreign policy, and national security.





Tibetan & Himalayan Digital Library

9 07 2007

URL: http://www.thdl.org/. “[A]n international community using Web-based technologies to integrate diverse knowledge about Tibet and the Himalayas for free access…” Includes multimedia resources, texts, timelines, geographic resources, translation tools, mailing lists, discussion forums, and much more.





Harvard Iranian Oral History Project

26 06 2007

URL: http://ted.hul.harvard.edu:8080/ted/deliver/home?_collection=iohp. A project that collects personal accounts of over 150 individuals who were eyewitnesses (or active participants) to a range of crucial political events in Iran from the 1920s to the 1980s. From the About section users can learn about the history of the IHOP and the interviewing process. The Transcripts area houses an index of interviews, and in certain cases, audio recordings of these conversations.